Snavely Graduates from KHA Leadership Institute

Gretchen Snavely, Director of Human Resources for Holton Community Hospital, was one of 26 students who graduated from the Kansas Hospital Association Leadership Institute on Nov. 18 at the KHA Rural Health Symposium in Wichita, Kansas. Students were nominated by their hospital’s CEO to be part of this select group.

Helping to build future health care leaders is important to the Kansas Hospital Association. “We are committed to strengthening and promoting the leadership capacity of hospital employees in Kansas,” said Chad Austin, president and CEO, Kansas Hospital Association. The KHA Leadership Institute was established to help hospitals provide professional development opportunities that accentuate the personal skills and abilities needed to facilitate positive change and innovation in Kansas hospitals.

The 2021 Leadership Institute class was diverse. They represented a wide geographic distribution of hospitals from Hoxie to Lawrence and Neodesha to Elkhart – there was representation from all parts of the state. Students had been working in health care for as little as two years to more than 20 years. Several students have been in management positions while others were new managers. Some students also supervisor other staff, from a few to more than 50 employees.

It is important to note that the students nominated to participate in this program were not selected because they needed to learn “management skills.” They were nominated because their CEO recognized their potential to be future leaders and wanted to help cultivate that development. Each one of these students made a personal and professional commitment to expand their skills by attending all six courses of the Leadership Institute.

The curriculum was structured to enhance each student’s leadership abilities. Course #1 focused on explaining the difference between leadership and management, identifying organizational values and creating a positive organizational climate. Course #2 focused on enhancing communication skills and grassroots advocacy. Course #3 focused on team building – including how to lead a team and how to be part of a team and Course # 4 examined conflict and conflict management. Courses #5 was at the KHA Rural Health Symposium. Students learned about the challenges facing rural health care.

The Kansas Hospital Association is a voluntary, non-profit organization existing to be the leading advocate and resource for members. KHA membership includes 251 member facilities, of which 123 are full-service, community hospitals. Founded in 1910, KHA’s vision is: “Optimal Health for Kansans.”